In an era when nearly every practicing architect with a modicum of marketing savvy has a monograph or two dedicated to his or her work——but nineteenth-century architects like Richard Upjohn and Thomas U. Walter still await full treatment——perhaps the most remarkable thing about James F. O'Gorman's Henry Austin: In Every Variety of Architectural Style is that it was published at all. O'Gorman's monograph is dedicated to a little-known but prolific nineteenth-century practitioner who had a tremendous impact on the landscape of New Haven in particular, and Connecticut more generally, from the 1830s to the 1870s. Like most nineteenth-century architects, Austin has received little scholarly attention before now; O'Gorman's welcome book is an attempt to document and understand the full range of Austin's work.

The strength of the book is its meticulous and copious documentation of Austin's practice and designs. As O'Gorman...

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