Study of the architecture of ancient Alexandria presents a special challenge, since the modern city sprawls over the ancient city, and only small areas have been excavated. In this sumptuously illustrated volume, Judith McKenzie carefully pieces together a vast array of archaeological evidence, much of it indirect, to reconstruct the styles and types of architecture that were used in Alexandria during a millennium of its history. She argues, with some success, that the famous capital was a constant leader and innovator in architectural style and ornament for many centuries, and that Alexandrian influence was felt across the Mediterranean in a variety of settings and periods, such as Roman Pompeii and Byzantine Constantinople.

McKenzie begins (in part one) with a discussion of the relationship between the topography of ancient and modern Alexandria and the ways in which ancient Alexandria became lost to...

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