In his 1938 study Homo Ludens, the Dutch historian and cultural theorist Johan Huizinga set out to ascertain how far culture bears the character of play, insisting on the primacy of play and its essential relationship to freedom.1 As digital games spread far beyond their conceptual and commercial milieus of origination, they bring alternative modes of relation and representation to art and politics. Reflecting on such a "re-ludification" of culture, the curators of Homo Ludens Ludens, an international exhibition and conference, assess the role of games and play in contemporary artistic practices.

Following the exhibitions Gameworld (2007) and Playware (2008), Homo Ludens Ludens (2008) concludes the Gaming Trilogy, a series of exhibitions dedicated to digital games at the LABoral Centro de Arte y Creacióón Industrial in Gijóón, Spain. On its bilingual (Spanish/English) website, LABoral encourages the exploration of...

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