The survival and emendation of the classical tradition has fascinated scholars, architects, artists, and others for more than a thousand years. Quill pens, printing presses, cameras, and GPS receivers have all been called upon to record the fractured material remains of the past. Recently, web technology has joined this list of tools. The first three websites considered in this review examine how Rome was visited virtually in the 1500s and 1700s. The fourth website seeks to foster an understanding of the ideas that serve as the foundation for the classical tradition in architecture from Stonehenge to our own time.

Created with a grant from the Getty Foundation, Imago Urbis: Giuseppe Vasi's Grand Tour of Rome contains the 238 plates that embellished Vasi's ten-volume Delle magnificenze di Roma antica e moderna (1747–61) (Figure 1). Vasi (1710–1782) spent his career engraving...

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