My mother was a Southern woman through and through. She made no apologies for her molasses-thick Arkansas accent or the gold teeth that glistened when she smiled. Her face would light up brighter than fireflies on a July night when folks talked about how her collard greens, candied yams, and peach cobbler blessed their taste buds. I can still remember sitting on my grandparents’ porch listening to her tell tales about the beauty and hardship of growing up below the Mason-Dixon Line. My mother shares something with scholar Regina “Gina Mae” Bradley. They are unapologetically Southern and tell vivid stories about the South. In Chronicling Stankonia, Bradley examines and analyzes the work of post-civil rights storytellers, authors, and artists who use their artistic catalogs to reinterpret and reimagine the stories we tell about Southern culture, the South, and the black folks who call it home.

Bradley begins Chronicling Stankonia...

You do not currently have access to this content.