Songsters, “pocket-sized anthologies of popular songs,” present a vibrant cultural form common in English-speaking countries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (1). Suggestive of music (but frequently published without musical notation), the songster is an interdisciplinary endeavor. It was created to promote singing but reads more like a collection of poems. The editors of Cheap Print and Popular Song in the Nineteenth Century: A Cultural History of the Songster, Paul Watt, Derek B. Scott, and Patrick Spedding, acknowledge the multifaceted function of these small books of songs. They are also correct in saying that the songster is an important and distinct form, one that didn’t...

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