Timothy Taylor’s Music and Capitalism: A History of the Present examines the relationships between capitalism and music. While not a new research idea, no other work to date has considered such relationships from the variety of perspectives afforded in Taylor’s work. Specifically, the book combines global and local scenes, as well as recent versus long-term histories. Music, Taylor consistently argues, “exists in different regimes of value, sometimes as a commodity, sometimes as a gift, sometimes as something else altogether—never fixed” (p. 10). This approach facilitates a rich engagement with the contradictory aspects of musical production, from its dual status as art and commodity to the identity-forming...

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