Forty years have passed since the inception of punk, yet interest in punk history has intensified within the last decade or so. Along with a proliferation of memoirs, scholarship, and exhibitions, students of the genre have seen a decided shift toward the documentation and analysis of local scenes. In other words, while punk was certainly a global phenomenon, overarching histories of punk are now outnumbered by case studies that examine specific scenes and their relation to local histories of music, other creative practices, and formulations of place, race, gender, and sexuality. As a byproduct of this phenomenon, generalized understandings of punk as rebellion, aesthetic, or attitude...

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