When I was invited to contribute a piece on writing autoethnography, I immediately said yes, not knowing all the drama that would unfold to not only make my contribution rather late, but also to impact the actual outcome of my writing. I love writing: it’s been a way to process my thoughts and experiences from way back when I was in high school. Whether it was to process a broken heart from my puppy love at seventeen, or my divorce at forty-five, writing helps me make sense of my internal world and external realities.

Autoethnographic writing is the gift that keeps on giving, from that moment in 2008 when Heewon Chang1 introduced me to the method soon after I joined the faculty at Eastern University, to this present moment navigating working from home, teaching online, and embracing the...

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