Autoethnography has become a prominent methodology. Beginning as personal reflections in ethnography,1 it sprang to the fore with Carolyn Ellis’s Final Negotiations: A Story of Love, Loss, and Chronic Illness.2 With the Handbook of Autoethnography,3 recent books focused on the methodology,4 and the international, referred Journal ofAutoethnography, the possibilities of the methodology are strong and growing. Yet, due to the increasing pressure of neoliberalism on what constitutes research, many students are facing denial from their institutions that autoethnography constitutes research. These students are being told they cannot use the methodology for their dissertation work.

In the following, I present a letter to students on writing autoethnography in neoliberal times. First, I discuss autoethnography as a methodology. Next, I discuss the neoliberal regime and its influence on research. Third, I note three...

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