Autoethnography is a powerful personal research method that has exploded in popularity over the last two decades, owing to a broadening appreciation of nontraditional and previously marginalized epistemologies. Eisner1 argued that “knowledge is rooted in experience and requires a form for its representation.” Autoethnography offers such a means to express and analyze individual experience, tapping into “the power of one.”2 What makes it possible to use experience to expand social knowledge is that “there is nothing completely idiosyncratic about a single personality.”3 Our lives are lived within social relationships, and the study of experience-in-context can offer unique insights into collectivity and culture.4 Interestingly, the social connections inherent in our lives, which make autoethnography a viable method of discovery, also have implications for the practice of autoethnography itself. While the purpose of autoethnography is to infuse...

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