How do we communicate with the dead? How do we live with grief? How do we move forward with loss? How do we continue to have relationships with loved ones even after their death? Blake Paxton’s At Home with Grief: Continued Bonds with the Deceased explores these questions by providing an intimate, autoethnographic homage to his mother. Weaving his memories of his mother with others’ voices—his father’s, his grandmother’s, his aunts’, and his mother’s clients and close friends—Paxton calls us to remember his mother. Through the autoethnographic lens, he “investigates how continuing a bond with the deceased is a relational, communicative, and communal phenomenon.”1 In doing so, he asks us to reconsider our own relationship with death and loss.

Paxton’s strength lies in his storytelling. His narrative writing invites us into the life of his mother, Ann. At...

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