Qualitative inquiry, in general, and autoethnography, specifically, is highly contested in educational research, a discipline within which I work. Long-established criticisms and misunderstandings about autoethnography are rampant in educational research. These include the lack of value in knowledge construction from the perspective of one person, indulgent naval gazing, and overall lack of empiricism. In my autoethnographies within educational research, I have tried to contribute critically and de/colonially to the conversation by directly connecting autoethnographic narratives to issues of justice and equity, and by demonstrating the value of compelling narratives and theorization. My commitment to writing autoethnographies, using my unreliable narrator voice, is to illustrate that within this methodological possibility we can enact an assemblage of theory, spirituality, community, culture, and self together. This is indeed a challenge, not just for enacting the assemblage, but for integrating spirit into justice...

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