The papers presented in this volume were first delivered at a conference convened at Victoria College at the University of Toronto in September 2017. In his “Introduction” Nicholas Terpstra summarizes the aims of the various authors as moving “outside of Germany and the northern European sphere generally in order to trace global developments” and to explore “some of the ways Reformation movements shaped relations” with other Christians, other world religions, and aboriginal peoples (7). The aims of the volume may be transnational and global, but they are also comparative, as the second introductory piece by Luke Clossey demonstrates. He compares the parallel developments of reform movements and territorial expansion in Buddhism and Islam in the early modern period to Christianity. As he reminds, Christianity’s expansion, while decidedly larger in its global dimensions at the time, was certainly not singular....

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