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african-american-vocalists

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Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2019) 72 (2): 313–361.
Published: 01 August 2019
... backing music. Gaye's interest in ballads connects to a different tradition of American music from his soul hits, drawing on the legacy of 1920s crooning, mainstream swing vocalists like Frank Sinatra, and African American forebears such as Nat “King” Cole and Sam Cooke. This article makes a number of new...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2014) 67 (1): 125–165.
Published: 01 April 2014
...Julia J. Chybowski Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield was first in a lineage of African American women vocalists to earn national and international acclaim. Born into slavery in Mississippi, she grew up in Philadelphia and launched her first North American concert tour from upstate New York in 1851...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2012) 65 (1): 113–178.
Published: 01 April 2012
... Cooke popular music long-playing album African American vocalists reception history Journal of the American Musicological Society, Vol. 65, Number 1, pp. 113 178 ISSN 0003-0139, electronic ISSN 1547-3848. © 2012 by the American Musicological Society. All rights reserved. Please direct all...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2019) 72 (3): 825–865.
Published: 01 December 2019
...Kira Thurman When African American concert singers began to perform German lieder in central Europe in the 1920s, white German and Austrian listeners were astounded by the veracity and conviction of their performances. How had they managed to sing like Germans? This article argues that black...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2019) 72 (1): 181–243.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Braxton D. Shelley This article presents an analytical paradigm that employs the repetitive musical cycle known as “the vamp” to illuminate the interrelation of form, experience, and meaning in African American gospel music, focusing on music performed by gospel choirs with soloists. I argue that...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2018) 71 (2): 439–525.
Published: 01 August 2018
... became the first African American to win a Tony.) Amores was for prepared piano and three percussionists (Robert Fizdale, Karl Kritz, and Stanley Lock at this performance). 42. At the end of the autograph manuscript Cage wrote, “New York City / Winter 1943–44”: John Cage Music Manuscript...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2016) 69 (1): 179–236.
Published: 01 April 2016
... no room on the programs for the works of the 1960s that treated Hiroshima and European colonialism ( Canti di vita e d'amore , 1962), the exploitation of factory workers ( La fabbrica illuminata , 1964), and African American civil rights ( Contrappunto dialettico alla mente , 1968). 17. I am...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2014) 67 (1): 308–309.
Published: 01 April 2014
... cultural biography of African American vocalist Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield. JONATHAN DE SOUZA is an assistant professor in the Don Wright Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario. He recently received a PhD from the University of Chicago, where his work was supported by the Social Sciences...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2014) 67 (3): 769–824.
Published: 01 December 2014
...Benjamin Piekut John Cage's brand of experimentalism underwent a transformation when it was imported into the UK in the 1960s. There, in contradiction to the American's well-known preferences, indeterminacy became twisted up with jazz-derived free improvisation, owing to discourse that stressed...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2014) 67 (1): 167–237.
Published: 01 April 2014
... , and Robert Walser . “Theorizing the Body in African-American Music.” Black Music Research Journal 14 ( 1994 ): 75 – 84 . Meehan, Norman . Time Will Tell: Conversations with Paul Bley . Berkeley : Berkeley Hills Books , 2003 . Meyer, Leonard B. Explaining Music: Essays and...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2013) 66 (3): 825–872.
Published: 01 December 2013
... African American victim respectively, which has also served a US nationalist rhetoric of tolerance and egalitarianism in contrast to Islamic fundamentalism (Reddy, Freedom with Violence; Puar, Terrorist Assemblages). Here, as in many accounts and critiques, the representational subjects at the nexus of...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2013) 66 (2): 437–474.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Laura Tunbridge The recreation of Jenny Lind's first American concert by soprano Frieda Hempel in 1920 was a popular success, but raised a number of questions for critics. Examining its reception—and that of the concert on tour in Britain—shines light on postwar attitudes toward music history, as...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2008) 61 (1): 231–237.
Published: 01 April 2008
... scholarship by Africans conveys an affirmation of the insider s voice. Ampene defends his culture against the disparagement of underinformed outsiders and creates value for Asante society through the 232 Journal of the American Musicological Society documentation, analysis, and interpretation of its heritage...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2008) 61 (1): 224–231.
Published: 01 April 2008
..., imagining with great vividness the musical world in which Armstrong lived. In one striking example he uses the present tense to place the reader in the middle of an African American parade, circa 1910: [The parade] is led by the grand marshal, dressed in full splendor with the longest sash of any marcher...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2008) 61 (1): 67–121.
Published: 01 April 2008
... (Stomping the Blues, 148). 3. Tom Davin, Conversation with James P. Johnson, in Jazz Panorama, ed. Martin Williams (New York: Crowell-Collier, 1962; repr., New York: Da Capo, 1979), 56; quoted in Jacqui Malone, Steppin on The Blues: The Visible Rhythms of African American Dance (Urbana and Chicago...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2005) 58 (1): 247–260.
Published: 01 April 2005
... non-issue for Mexicans (p. 18). The tension between white and African American culture represented in rock n roll was mirrored only later in Mexico with the associa- tion of rock n roll with desmadre, a lower-class slang word that expresses the idea of social chaos through the unmothering of an...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2004) 57 (1): 119–174.
Published: 01 April 2004
... content from a slur for African Americans which is not surprising since songwriters like Jerome and Schwartz often composed both types. But the singular quali- ties of Chinese-themed songs are equally significant. Instead of demonstrating a generic strategy of ethnic demonization, a song such as...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2003) 56 (3): 770–790.
Published: 01 December 2003
... Its African American Roots MAURICE PERESS In Dvorak to Duke Ellington the promi- nent symphony conductor Maurice Peress describes his career and experi- ences with American music and musicians. Alongside accounts of recreated concerts and world pre- mieres, he revisits Dvorak's three year residency in...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2003) 56 (2): 507–514.
Published: 01 August 2003
... establishment of direct interactive communication between singer and audience-an element Racy believes is missing in some analyses of Arabic music-as much as it does on individual musical expertise or inspiration. In Eve Harwood's compact discussion of improvisation among African American girls, audience...
Journal Articles
Journal of the American Musicological Society (2001) 54 (3): 692–709.
Published: 01 December 2001
... vaudeville. Madonna has consistently rein- scribed such standard images as pornographic lesbians,9 kinky or infantilized gay men, hypersexualized African and Latino bodies,10 and subservient African American women,11 without really giving us any good parodic performance of these stereotypes (despite Faith's...