Rapturous excitement greeted Haydn when he arrived in England in 1791. British entrepreneurs had pursued him for years, and the Gazetteer reported a (failed) 1787 attempt to attract the composer: “Mr. Hammersley, the Banker, has now become the negociator [sic], and as his notes are in as great estimation as those of Haydn, there is little doubt that he will prevail on him to visit England” (quoted p. 32). This commentary mirrors two of the book’s themes: the pun on “notes” resembles Nicholas Mathew’s own delight in dual meanings, while the equivalency between the banker’s currency and Haydn’s musical stock reinforces one of his central points—that “Haydn lived through a moment in which it made no sense wholly to separate the demands of art from the demands of the market” (p. 8). Mathew argues that Haydn’s activities illustrate a network of media, aesthetic, and capitalist experimentation that immediately...

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