The musica secreta or Concerto delle Dame—otherwise known as the singing ladies of Ferrara—has been well known in musicological circles since Angelo Solerti wrote about it in the early twentieth century, and since the 1970s it has had more and more play. But I do not recall seeing it in a book that uses the word “uxoricide” (a man who murders his wife) prior to Laurie Stras’s Women and Music in Sixteenth-Century Ferrara. She writes, “While uxoricides are not uncommon in Renaissance music history (during the sixteenth century, Ferrara even welcomed two from beyond its borders, Bartolomeo Tromboncino and Don Carlo Gesualdo), the Avogadri case is unusual, for it ends with the murderers meeting justice through capital punishment” (pp. 294–95). This juicy little sentence appears amid a discussion of musicians supported in Lucrezia d’Este’s will that subtly infuses the presentation of undiscovered music with an exposition of the violence...

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