Sounding Together: Collaborative Perspectives on U.S. Music in the 21st Century, edited by Charles Hiroshi Garrett and Carol J. Oja, is easily one of the most rewarding essay collections I have ever read. In the introduction, Garrett and Oja make two complementary claims. First, they present the virtues (and potential pitfalls) of collaborative research and writing, arguing that working in teams “opens up new research vistas, enabling scholars to learn and grow together and to move more flexibly across time, place, region, and genre” (p. 10). Second, they explain that music in the United States presents an especially rich source of collaborative engagement. “Not only does it inherently cross dozens of disciplines,” they observe, “but it also traverses media, regions, geographies, nations, genres, economies, cultures, identities, and much more. It is literally all over the place” (p. 1). Reading the book as a scholar researching the music of African...

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