Drag queens and female impersonators have long received greater attention than drag kings and male impersonators. While RuPaul's Drag Race continues a decade-long pathway to celebrity and huge increases in pay and touring ability for drag queens, drag kings have yet to receive their own television series or equivalent access to money and fame. At the academic level, kings and male impersonators have long been underrepresented in the literature on gender illusion and drag. While Judith Butler's Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity (1990) importantly examined the constructed nature of gender and Marjorie Garber's Vested Interests: Cross-Dressing and Cultural Anxiety (1992) documented historical moments of cross-dressed performance, these works provide little or no lineage for a specific tradition of drag or gender impersonation, instead focusing on cross-dressed performances across history and the performance of gender in daily life.1 Though drag became a central topic for academia, performers...

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