The subfield of British music studies, once considered a sleepy backwater within musicology, has witnessed an explosion of activity over the last two decades. In part, the expanding interest in British music mirrors musicology's ongoing shift in focus away from works and artists originating in continental Europe. Nations whose contributions were once considered peripheral to this “grand tradition”—most notably the United States and Russia—today inspire vital and creative scholarship, and the United Kingdom has now joined them. Thanks also to the efforts of pioneering figures such as Stephen Banfield, Philip Brett, Cyril Ehrlich, Ellen Harris, and Nicholas Temperley—who have carefully and diligently nurtured fields that had long lain fallow—new generations of British music specialists are reaping bumper crops, an intellectual harvest remarkable for both its topical diversity and its scholarly rigor.

Perhaps no period has benefitted more from this state of affairs than the early twentieth century. Anchored by research...

You do not currently have access to this content.