I wish I had had a tool like this twenty years ago. At about that time I was engaged on a stylistic analysis of the three-voice Mass in the later fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries as part of my doctoral studies.1 My aims were ambitious: to understand some fundamental changes in the way musical textures operated and were conceived across as broad a sample as possible of pieces with shared scoring and texts. It was painstaking work, involving the close study—aided only by pen and paper—of what I had selected as a corpus of “representative” scores. This produced some useful conclusions about changing approaches to musical texture: I was able to trace a steady if piecemeal shift toward an increasingly stratified and contrapuntally nonhierarchic texture, to plot some important steps in the germination of the imitative style and the conditions that stimulated it, and to witness some intriguing mismatches...

You do not currently have access to this content.