I wish I had had a tool like this twenty years ago. At about that time I was engaged on a stylistic analysis of the three-voice Mass in the later fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries as part of my doctoral studies.1 My aims were ambitious: to understand some fundamental changes in the way musical textures operated and were conceived across as broad a sample as possible of pieces with shared scoring and texts. It was painstaking work, involving the close study—aided only by pen and paper—of what I had selected as a corpus of “representative” scores. This produced some useful conclusions about changing approaches to musical texture: I was able to trace a steady...

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