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proximate-causation

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Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (2017) 47 (2): 127–163.
Published: 01 April 2017
... concepts and practices in evolutionary biology. Furthermore, it contributes to a growing literature that undermines the historical division between proximate and ultimate causation in biology. © 2017 by the Regents of the University of California 2017 coevolution insect-plant interactions...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (2018) 48 (2): 123–179.
Published: 01 April 2018
...): 73 114; Walter Ott, Causation and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009). 41. See, for example, Friedrich Steinle, The Amalgamation of a Concept: Laws of Nature in the New Sciences in Laws of Nature: Essays on the Philosophical, Scientific, and Historical...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (2010) 40 (3): 279–317.
Published: 01 August 2010
... as a desirable model within biology.12 This paper addresses three problems that organismic biologists believed were in need of solutions in order to succeed in their struggle with the molecular biologists: Were ideas of reductionism and causation developed in the physical sciences applicable to...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (2008) 38 (1): 45–75.
Published: 01 February 2008
... to regard them as if designed, but because they are natural prod- ucts, the notion of design must remain metaphorical. Indeed, Kant s invocation of final causation seems itself to have been analogical: the organic must be explained as if it were constituted as teleological. Teleological judgment is...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (1998) 28 (2): 301–336.
Published: 01 January 1998
... direct me to an underlying philosophical struggle between a mechanistic philosophy that strictly separated efficient and final causation, and a movement to rejoin cause with purpose (? 1). Franklin's fusion of pragmatism with teleology resonated with this very sore point in contemporary French...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (1977) 8: 189–256.
Published: 01 January 1977
... scientific pursuits.17 Since Pauli and Heisenberg thought of themselves as insulated from the broader society when they worked on theoretical physics in the early 1920's, it is not surprising that the proximate motivations for many of the central developments in their thinking are to be found within physics...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (1976) 7: 125–160.
Published: 01 January 1976
.... Planck, "Vom Relativen zum Absoluten," op. cit (note 56), p. 153. 71 lbid. "Kausalgesetz und Willensfreiheit," (1923), in Wege . . . , op. cit. (note 55), p. 128. James Murphy in M. Planck, Where is Science Going? (New York, 1932): "Causation and Free Will: The Problem Stated," pp. 107–140...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (1975) 6: 325–404.
Published: 01 January 1975
... system rests on theological foundations, the central concepts of which are determinism, necessity, causation, and materialism. Rational dissent shows how these concepts are compatible with Scripture, which contains nothing either paradoxical or "contrary to all natural appearances."7 Priestley's interpre...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (1971) 3: 233–306.
Published: 01 January 1971
... dichotomy throughout the natural philosophy of the period between "mechanists" who sought the "causation for all the phenomena of nature . . . [in] the primary particles of an undifferentiable matter . . . [their] combinations . . . their motions, and the forces of attraction and repulsion between them...
Journal Articles
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences (1969) 1: 1–36.
Published: 01 January 1969
... claim is in fact this: we start with (2), with causes, and then pretend to have started with (1), with facts. And, when discussing (2), the causes, Herschel does offer, to use Bacon's term, some "aids to the in tellect": he recommends the employment of what he calls "proximate causes" and others...