[Footnotes]

[Footnotes]
1
Charles Cutter, "Outstanding collection by a great scientist spans 500 years," Brandeis imprint, 9:4 (1989), 9
Gerald Holton and S.S. Schweber, "Eloges: Bern Dibner, 1897–1988," Isis, 79 (1988), 475–477.
2
Giorgio Israel, "Volterra Archive at the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei," His- toria mathematica, 9 (1982), 229–238.
3
Entries on Volterra in DSB, 14 (1976), 85–88
Royal Society of London, Obi- tuary Notices of Fellows, 3 (1941), 691–729
Judith R. Goodstein, "The rise and fall of Vito Volterra's world," Journal of the history of ideas, 45 (1984), 607–617
G. Israel and L. Nurzia, "Fundamental trends and conflicts in Italian mathematics between the two world wars," Archives internationales d'histoire des sciences, 39 (1989), 111–143.
4
Sharon E. Kingsland, Modeling nature: Episodes in the history of population ecolo- gy (Chicago, 1985), 106–116, 124, 132, 139, 152–153
Garrett Birkhoffand Erwin Kreyszig, "The establishment of functional analysis," Historica mathematica, 11 (1984), 258–321
Morris Kline, Mathematical thought from ancient to modern times (New York, 1972), 1044–1060, 1076–1081.
5
William B. Provine, "In praise of scientific reprint collections," in Edward C. Car- ter II, ed.,Scientific reprint collections: A conference sponsored by the American Philo- sophical Society Library April 1984 (Philadelphia, 1986), 2–4.
6
David Edge, "Quantitative measures of communication in science: A criti- cal review," History of Science, 77 (1979), 102–134.
7
Helen Wills Samuels, "Scientific reprint collections—A post–1940 perspective," in Carter (ref. 5), 4–7.
8
William Spawn, "The conservation of scientific reprints," in Carter (ref. 5), 8–9.
9
H.G. Zeuthen, Foreláesning over Mathematikens Historie, II: 16de og 17de Aarhun- drede (Copenhagen, 1903), ii
Skuli Sigurdsson, "Equivalence, pragmatic platonism, and discovery of the calculus," in Mary Jo Nye, Joan L. Richards, and Roger H. Stuewer, eds., The invention of physical science: Intersections of mathematics, theolo- gy and natural philosophy since the seventeenth century. Essays in honor of Erwin N. Heibert (Dordrecht, 1992).
10
Paul Forman, "Scientific internationalism and the Weimar physicists: The ideolo- gy and its manipulation in Germany after World War I," Isis, 64 (1973), 151–180, esp. 177–180.
11
Judith R. Goodstein, "The Italian mathematicians of relativity," Centaurus, 26 (1983), 241–261
Carlo Cattani and Michelangelo De Maria, "Max Abraham and the re- ception of relativity in Italy: His 1912 and 1914 controversies with Einstein," and "The 1915 epistolary controversy between Einstein and Tullio Levi-Civita," in Don Howard and John Stachel, eds., Einstein and the history of general relativity (Boston, 1989), 160–200
U. Cisotti, "Über den Anteil Italiens an dem Fortschritt der klassischen Hydrodynamik in den letzten fünfzehn Jahren," in Th. v. Kármán and T. Levi-Civita, eds., Vorträge aus dem Gebiete der Hydro- und Aerodynamik (Berlin, 1924), 1–17.
12
Renate Tobies, Felix Klein (Leipzig, 1981), 90–91.
13
Jean Eisenstaedt, "The low-water mark of general relativity, 1925–1955," in Howard and Stachel (ref. 11), 277–292.
14
Christa Jungnickel and Russell McCormmach, The intellectual mastery of na- ture: Theoretical physics from Ohm to Einstein (2 vols., Chicago, 1986).
15
John Archibald Wheeler, "Preface," in Thomas S. Kuhn, John L. Heilbron, Paul Forman, and Lini Allen, Sources for history of quantum physics: An inventory and report (Philadelphia, 1967), v-ix, on v.
16
David Cahan, "Pride and prejudice in the history of physics: The German speak- ing world, 1740–1945," HSPS, 19:1 (1988), 173–191, esp., 186–191.
17
ref. 11
Gerald Holton, "Fermi's group and the recapture of Italy's place in physics," in his The scientific imagination: Case studies (Cambridge, 1978), 155–198
Barbara J. Reeves, Italian physicists and their institutions, 1861–1911 (Ph.D. diss., Harvard University, 1980), and her "Einstein politicized: The early reception of relativity in Italy," in Thomas F. Glick, ed., The comparative recep- tion of relativity (Dordrecht, 1987), 189–229
Arturo Russo, "Science and industry in Italy between the two world wars," HSPS, 16:2 (1986), 281–320.
18
Skuli Sigurdsson, Hermann Weyl, mathematics and physics, 1900–1927 (Ph.D diss., Harvard University, 1991).
19
Hermann Weyl, lecture given at the Princeton Bicentennial Celebration in 1946 (Weyl Nachlass HS 9la:18, ETH, Zurich).
20
Veblen to Weyl, 22 Mar and 10 Apr 1928, response 19 Apr 1928 (Veblen Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)
Veblen to Weyl, 28 Oct 1931 (Weyl Nachlass HS 91: 781, ETH, Zurich).
21
L. Pearce Williams, review in Isis, 80 (1989), 572–573.
This content is only available via PDF.

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview