[Footnotes]

[Footnotes]
*
Department of Rhetoric, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720.
1
Alexandre Koyre, "Les Queries de VOptique," Archives inter- national d'histoire des sciences, 13 (1960), 15–29.
2
Guerlac, "The background to Dalton's atomic theory," in D. S. L. Cardwell, ed., John Dalton and the progress of science (New York, 1968), 57–91, esp. 62–67.
3
Robert E. Schofield's Mechanism and materialism (Princeton, 1970)
Arnold Thackray's A toms and powers (Cambridge, Mass., 1971).
4
Newton, Opticks or a treatise of the reflections, refractions, inflections and colours of light (New York, 1952), 375–376.
5
Lexicon technicum: or A universal English dictionary of arts and sciences explaining not only the terms of art but the arts themselves (2 vols., London, 1704–10) 1, s.v. "Men struum," "Elasticity."
6
Ibid., 2, s.v. "Salt."
7
Ibid., 2, s.v. "Elasticity," "Atmosphere," and "Attraction."
8
M. B. Hall, "Newton on chemistry, atomism, the aether, and heat," in I. B. Cohen, ed., Isaac Newton's papers and letters on natural philosophy and related docu- ments (Cambridge, 1958), 241–268, on 257–258.
9
Francis Hauksbee, "An experiment touching the weighing of bodies of the same species, but of very unequal surfaces, in common water, being of an equal weight in common air," PT, 26 (1707), 306–308
Guerlac, "Francis Hauksbee: Experimenteur au profit de Newton," Archives Internationales d'histoire des sciences, 16 (1963), 113–128.
10
Physico-mechanical experiments on various subjects containing an account of several surprising phenomena touching light and elec- tricity producible on the attrition of bodies (London, 1709).
11
Roderick W. Home, "Francis Hauksbee's theory of electricity," Archive for history of exact sciences, 3 (1966), 203–217
Gad Freudenthal, "Early electricity between chemistry and physics," HSPS, 11 (1981), 203–229.
12
Hauksbee (ref. 10), 86.
14
Freind's Chemicae lectiones (London, 1709)
Chymical lectures (London, 1712)
"J. M." Keill's "De legibus attractionis aliaque physices principia," PT, 26 (1708), 97–110
Philosophical transactions... abridg'd, ed. Henry Jones, vol. 5, 3rd. ed., (London, 1749), 414–423.
15
William Whiston, Sir Isaac Newton's mathematical philosophy (London, 1716), 126
Roger Cotes, Hydrostatical lectures (London, 1738), 126.
16
William Derham, Physico-theology, or A demonstration of the being and attributes of God from his works of creation (London, 1712).
17
Benjamin Woorster, Compendious account of natural philosophy (London, 1722), 32–36.
19
Stephan Hales, Vegetable staticks, or, An account of some statical experiments on the sap in vegetables (London, 1727), 95.
21
Hales (ref. 19), xxvii.
22
"A letter concerning electricity," PT, 38 (1733), 262
J. L. Heilbron, Electricity in the 17th and 18th centuries (Berkeley, 1979), chapt. 9.
23
Jean Théophile Desaguliers, "An account of a book entitul'd Vegetable staticks!' PT, 34 0728), 264–291, 323–331.
24
Desaguliers, "An attempt to solve the phenomenon of the rise of vapours, forma- tion of clouds, and descent of rain," PT, 35 (1729), 6–22.
25
Desaguliers, "Some thoughts and conjectures concerning the cause of elasticity," PT, 41 (1739), 175–185.
26
ref. 25
ibid., 181
27
Desaguliers, "Some thought and experiments concerning electricity," PT, 41 (1739), 188–193.
28
Esp., Desaguliers, "Some further observations concerning electricity," PT, 42 (1942), 14–18.
29
Desaguliers, "An account of some electrical experiments," PT, 41 (1741), 637–639.
30
"Some conjectures concerning electricity and the rise of vapours," PT, 42 (1742), 140–143.
Heilbron (ref. 22), 290–294.
31
Desaguliers, "A dissertation on the cause of the rise of vapours and exhalations in the air," in Desaguliers, A course of experimental philosophy, vol. 2 (London, 1744), 336–350.
32
Cohen, Franklin and Newton (Philadelphia, 1956).
33
Ibid., part 3.
34
Schofield (ref. 3), chapt., 5.
35
Gowin Knight, An attempt to demonstrate that all phenomena of nature may be explained by two simple active principles (London, 1746), 10.
36
L. Pearce Williams, Michael Faraday (New York, 1965)
The origins of field theory (New York, 1966).
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