Since the global financial crisis, the legitimacy of neoliberalism has been in tatters. The year 2019 saw mass street protests in Chile, Lebanon, and France. All of them were sparked by bread-and-butter issues such as the rising cost of transport and the diminishing access to public services. All of them targeted neoliberal policies as their antagonists and faced brutal police repression as a result. To many, neo-liberal hegemony had now withdrawn tear gas canisters and rubber bullets from the velvet glove of mass propaganda and institutional capture. We were witnessing the last stages of its final demise, the raging violence a telling sign of the desperation of its disciples.

Some of us are convinced that neoliberalism is not going away anytime soon and that the rise of populism has not sounded its death knell. Far from being antagonistic, Thomas Biebricher warns us in his article that the amalgam of the...

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