The final part of this, in every sense, substantial volume canvasses the theme of global citizenship. Such a focus reveals the strengths and opportunities but also the shortcomings of social science that musters under the “global studies” rubric. Its six cognate chapters span civil society, citizenship, global movements, humanitarian organizations, global law, and global governance. Each makes for informative reading and, charged with the difficult task of reviewing the state of the art while delivering an argument fit to engage the critical reader, manages that difficult balancing act with aplomb.

However, to cluster all these chapters under the mantle of global citizenship is challenging, not least because there is little in the way of editorial guidance to point the reader toward what one might imagine to be the primary aims of the collection—specifying what it takes for something to be designated as global, how best to study emergent globalities, and...

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