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oyster-saloon

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Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2014; 1425–15 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2014.14.2.5
Published: 01 May 2014
... catered to Australian tastes and became the social hubs of their communities. After establishing the diverse and evolving nature of food offered in Greek shops since their origins in the late nineteenth century – oyster saloons, cafés, fish shops, fruit shops, milk bars, snack bars, confectioneries – this...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2012; 12437–45 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/GFC.2012.12.4.37
Published: 01 November 2012
... sailors mess, served on elegant wares in the passenger saloon, or stored away in the sealed hold, the food carried by clipper ships both sustained and shaped San Francisco. 38 G a S t r o N o m ic a w iN t e r 2 0 1 2 brutal, nearly surreal conditions at what had been unimagi- nable speeds . The...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2011; 11144–52 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2011.11.1.44
Published: 01 February 2011
... grander rivals, the Astor House or the St . Nicholas Above: The Dining Room of New York s Fifth Avenue Hotel, 1859. From Harper s Weekly, October 1, 1859. collection of a.k. sandoval-strausz 46 G a S t r o N o m ic a S p r iN G 2 0 1 1 The Complete Cook (here the oysters are chopped before being baked in...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2009; 9432–42 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2009.9.4.32
Published: 01 November 2009
... M IC A F A L L 2 0 0 9 highlighting the layout of the dining saloon. Rather than being located forward or aft where the ship s jerks were pronounced, the Titanic promised third-class passengers meals served amidships on the middle deck in an area consisting of two saloons extending from ship s...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2009; 92110 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2009.9.2.110a
Published: 01 May 2009
.... Corral in 1881, when Deputy Sheriff Wyatt Earp and John Doc Holliday squared off against the Clantons and McLaurys. If these cowboys ever set boots in an establish- ment, it was through swinging saloon doors. There was a lot more to Tombstone than that, accord- ing to writer Sherry Monahan in her book...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2009; 92110–111 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2009.9.2.110b
Published: 01 May 2009
.... Corral in 1881, when Deputy Sheriff Wyatt Earp and John Doc Holliday squared off against the Clantons and McLaurys. If these cowboys ever set boots in an establish- ment, it was through swinging saloon doors. There was a lot more to Tombstone than that, accord- ing to writer Sherry Monahan in her book...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2008; 8240–50 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2008.8.2.40
Published: 01 May 2008
... occasionally ventured there on slumming tours.19 In The Big Oyster Mark Kurlansky writes that Dickens made it fashionable to visit America s worst slum. Small groups under police escort would wander the streets to ogle the poor, stare at alcoholism and debauch- ery, be voyeurs in what New York Tribune writer...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2004; 4169–73 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2004.4.1.69
Published: 01 February 2004
... did soft drinks or French fries. Instead, milk and breakfast cereal were the big attractions, along with oysters, eggs, pie, coffee, and ham sandwiches. Meat dishes generally played a lesser role than pastries, cereals, and sandwiches. In Chicago and New York, quick lunches were hailed as some of the...