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natural-food

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Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2018; 18144–54 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2018.18.1.44
Published: 01 February 2018
... during the 1830s; the Natural Food Company, maker of Shredded Wheat and an advocate for “natural food” in the early 1900s; and Michael Pollan, a leading figure in contemporary American food politics. These activists and manufacturers have spoken in an anti-intellectual style about nature and food...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2019; 19460–73 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2019.19.4.60
Published: 01 November 2019
... issues, and even highly explosive topics such as national identity. The innocuous and ostensibly apolitical nature of food allows Israeli-Jewish tourists to come to terms, at least to a certain extent, with messages that may contradict some of the significant Zionist-Jewish narratives. This article is...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2018; 18176–82 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2018.18.1.76
Published: 01 February 2018
... and what is eaten out of pleasure each takes on an increasingly economic character. The etymology of “offal” itself reveals the dual nature of organ meat as both a food of necessity (a source of inexpensive protein) and a food of luxury (enjoyed as a delicacy). We are used to buying meat from the...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2018; 18314–27 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2018.18.3.14
Published: 01 August 2018
... place at the nation s table, what is missing in these accounts is a sense of wilderness as a nation-building trope that points to the contested nature of Canadianness. The stories that people tell about the foods that represent home reveal much about the entanglements between humans and their...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2015; 1523–9 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2015.15.2.3
Published: 01 May 2015
... to the creation of a global brand—the idea that Japanese food has a native superiority. In addition, the fantasies distract consumers from environmental insult; the talk of Japanese love and respect of nature is at odds with the reality of its industrialization and urban sprawl. When Japanese chefs...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2015; 15434–49 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2015.15.4.34
Published: 01 November 2015
... represented in American culture as “natural” good cooks on the one hand and beset by obesity on the other, straddle an uncomfortable divide that is at the heart of contemporary debate about the nature of our food system. Yet, Black women as authorities in the kitchen and elsewhere in matters of food...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2020; 20230–36 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2020.20.2.30
Published: 01 May 2020
...Joel Harold Tannenbaum For more than four decades, a strange story has circulated both inside and outside of the academy concerning a 1970s experiment in which foods dyed strange colors were served under “special” lighting that made them appear normal. When the true colors of the meal were revealed...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2020; 20267–78 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2020.20.2.67
Published: 01 May 2020
..., anxiety, and worry, comes from broader concerns about individual and community health, weight, and well-being, as well as from longing for the relations that made certain foods seem naturally embedded in a particular community and rooted in a specific landscape. We consider and compare three very...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2019; 19420–27 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2019.19.4.20
Published: 01 November 2019
... episode through the lens art history, food history, and of social mores in seventeenth-century Rome, considering the history of the artichoke, Caravaggio s polemical naturalism, and contemporary attitudes to his art and behavior. GASTRONOMIC TRANSLATIONS | Jesse Locker GASTRONOMICA: THE JOURNAL OF...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2010; 10249–54 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2010.10.2.49
Published: 01 May 2010
...peter scholliers; anneke geyzen This essay touches upon questions about the use of food as an identity marker, the nature of local food, and the influence of foreign food. Since 1830, Belgium witnessed two international food waves that alternated with two local food waves, both opposing as well as...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2017; 17488–101 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2017.17.4.88
Published: 01 November 2017
...Laura Goering Nostalgia for the foods consumed in childhood is a phenomenon extensively documented by food studies scholars and exploited by marketers around the world. This article traces the evolution of the Soviet children's soft drink Buratino from its origins in the Brezhnev era through a...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2011; 11353–59 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2011.11.3.53
Published: 01 August 2011
...jude stewart The article compares recipes to make food with recipes to make color, specifically recipes to make natural dyes and paints before the era of synthetic industrial color. After reviewing conceptual definitions of recipes from food writers and scholars, the article discusses common...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2014; 1425–15 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2014.14.2.5
Published: 01 May 2014
... catered to Australian tastes and became the social hubs of their communities. After establishing the diverse and evolving nature of food offered in Greek shops since their origins in the late nineteenth century – oyster saloons, cafés, fish shops, fruit shops, milk bars, snack bars, confectioneries – this...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2015; 15340–46 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2015.15.3.40
Published: 01 August 2015
... nature and uses of information—are unveiled. The disparate conceptions of time and output delivery, together with the different rhythms of making business and making science, are discussed. To conclude, the “dating” and “flirting” stages of the relationship between social researchers and food retailers...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2016; 16319–30 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2016.16.3.19
Published: 01 August 2016
... the Middle East? To look for an answer, we should return to some of the basic qualities of food and of hummus. For one, the elastic and dynamic nature of food makes it a perfect vessel for complicated and polysemic ideas. Food, as opposed to most other material artifacts, is a matter in con- stant...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2011; 11466–73 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2012.11.4.66
Published: 01 November 2011
...Shayna Cohen Scientists and governments worldwide have, for decades, made mammoth efforts to “bank” agricultural biodiversity as an insurance policy against natural and manmade threats to the global food supply. Meanwhile, in recent years a perfect storm has been brewing: small-scale and midscale...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2017; 174127–140 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2017.17.4.127
Published: 01 November 2017
..., defendable boundaries, and collective entitlement. This research traces the production of eno-locality in contested spaces across political borders. Tracing the ascent of terroir as an organizing principle for the global wine culture and food industry, I examine the intersection of political geography...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2017; 1721–4 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2017.17.2.1
Published: 01 May 2017
..., and miso. But in growing and preparing these products as a link to Japanese harmony with nature, and in writing about them, nei- ther chefs nor food writers discuss the impact on the environ- ment. Specifically, the use of pesticides, single-crop agriculture such as rice, the fishing methodologies...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2009; 9136–49 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2009.9.1.36
Published: 01 February 2009
... was to be shunned in favor of a more natural cuisine. Of course, it proved extremely difficult to identify what qualified as natural cuisine. Did any form of human inter- vention render food unnatural? By the eighteenth century, two oppositional definitions of natural cuisine developed, with very...
Journal Articles
Gastronomica. 2011; 11446–54 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/gfc.2012.11.4.46
Published: 01 November 2011
... suggest that the desire for authenticity is solely linked with upper-class identity; we find, however, two distinct modes of authenticity. For the upper classes, authentic food is natural: not processed or artificial. For the working class, by contrast, authentic food is traditional: rooted in family...