Right to Harm conveys rural American citizens’ experiences when concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have moved into their towns, from the 1980s onward. Naming CAFOs “bad neighbors,” the film engages human, environmental, economic, and social themes by showing how the presence of CAFOs have threatened the health of communities. By generating and exacerbating human health concerns (e.g., breathing and skin diseases); polluting local air, land, and waterways; severely diminishing home and property values; and fundamentally altering quality of life and threatening sense of community, CAFOs are well known in the academic world (e.g., Kirby 2010; West et al. 2011; Hendrickson et al. 2020).

Presenting these issues through the eyes and voices of individuals gives viewers an opportunity to empathize with local experiences of an increasingly global industry. We hear a man describe how he is perpetually fearful of waking up one day to find a CAFO as...

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