In the catalog for the exhibition Printing the Revolution: The Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphics, 1965 to Now, curator E. Carmen Ramos identifies that the revolutionary moment of the Chicano movement “signified an individual and societal paradigm shift, as citizens, residents, and entire communities demanded equality and justice” (Ramos 2020: 23).1 The artists who participated in the Chicano Movement, or el Movimiento, rallied for broad-term social change for their community by creating “visually arresting works that catalyzed a Chicano public coming into awareness of itself” (24). It was in this moment, 1975, that the Royal Chicano Air Force (RCAF) and La Galería de la Raza (Galería), artist collectives in northern California, created a graphic calendar series titled Calendario de Comida 1976. The calendar celebrated their collective Chicano identity through art and food...

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