Stirrings, Lana Dee Povitz’s study of food activism in New York City in the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s, is an extraordinary achievement. At the core of the book are four rich and vivid case studies of food-focused organizing. It begins with the United Bronx Parents, an anti-poverty organization of largely African American and Puerto Rican parents who agitated to improve school lunches in the South Bronx and ended up helping to reform school lunch policy for the entire city. Next, Povitz looks at the development of the Park Slope Coop and its New Left activist roots. Then she moves on to God’s Love We Deliver, an organization that brought food and dignity to homebound sufferers of AIDS at the height of the pandemic, and finally, the Community Food Resource Center, a food-focused nonprofit that activists organized in the 1980s to fill the chasms of social need left behind by...

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