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alternatives-arrest

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Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2011; 24123–25 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2011.24.1.23
Published: 01 October 2011
... alternatives to arrest Federal Sentencing reporter Vol . 24 , no. 1 october 2011 23 Federal Sentencing Reporter, Vol. 24, No. 1, pp. 23 25, ISSN 1053-9867 electronic ISSN 1533-8363. ©2011 Vera Institute of Justice. All rights reserved. Please direct requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2020; 323147–152 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2020.32.3.147
Published: 01 February 2020
... protection orders; provided grants to encourage mandatory and pro- arrest policies for domestic violence; increased funding for domestic violence shelters; requested the National Acad- emy of Science to develop a research agenda on violence against women; established a federal civil rights cause of action...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2020; 323181–183 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2020.32.3.181
Published: 01 February 2020
... do more, so that sentencing law, policy, and practice can be informed, as Rick preached, by the best available information. What more am I especially eager to push you to study? In one word, everything, from (1) the front end of the sys- tem, exploring arrests, bail policies and practices, and...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2020; 323184–186 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2020.32.3.184
Published: 01 February 2020
... fond of this saying. He was a tireless analyst with unmatched knowledge and practical experience in the criminal justice system. In a day of mainframe computers and not far removed from punch cards, he was the guy trying to bring some sense to the aggregation of census data, arrest data, sentencing...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 322109–123 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.2.109
Published: 01 December 2019
... guidelines in the past four decades. What are the essential features of a well-designed guidelines system? What system features are more contestable? And is there any realistic alternative to guidelines? On the latter point, this article concludes (as did the 1999 survey) that well-designed guidelines are...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 32128–31 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.1.28
Published: 01 October 2019
... million juveniles arrested across the nation each year, 70% have an unmet mental need. For decades, leaders in our community have spent millions building prisons when we should have spent mil- lions building hospitals and mental health facilities and schools. The fact is, prisons are ill-suited to provide...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 32132–35 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.1.32
Published: 01 October 2019
... vio- lent offenders to participate in mental health court helps them and, in fact, affords greater protection to the public than prison. An example of this involves a man in his early twenties who was arrested for two street robberies in Brooklyn. In jail, he began acting bizarrely and was taken to...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 32142–49 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.1.42
Published: 01 October 2019
... well with forgiveness. . . . And the second thing . . . is . . . how we define the roles. . . . The way we think about policing . . . has to be different; the way we think about arrest . . . has to be different; the way we measure prosecution success has to be differ- ent . . . discretion of judges has...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 32136–41 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.1.36
Published: 01 October 2019
... Reentry Court Participation on Post- 40 FEDERAL SENTENCING REPORTER VOL . 32 , NO . 1 OCT OB ER 2019 Release Supervision Outcomes and Re-Arrest, Corrections (2019). 22 Timothy D. DeGiusti, Innovative Justice: Federal Reentry Courts How Should We Measure Success?, Federal Probation (Dec. 2018). 23...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 32115–19 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.1.15
Published: 01 October 2019
... relaxant that paralyzes all voluntary muscles and causes suf- focation; and potassium chloride, a toxin that induces irre- versible cardiac arrest 28 Bucklew, 139 S. Ct. at 1126; id. at 1137 39 (Breyer, J., dis- senting). Justice Breyer concluded in dissent that [t]he experts dispute whether Bucklew s...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 32123–27 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.1.23
Published: 01 October 2019
... States on a stu- dent visa, he was expelled from the Florida university where he had been enrolled, effectively terminating his lawful status. Rehaif was arrested after he shot firearms and pur- chased ammunition at a firing range. Despite the fact that Rehaif was informed by his university that, unless...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 32156–62 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.32.1.56
Published: 01 October 2019
... statistically significant lower arrest rates over the one-year follow-up period.21 As for imprisonment one year after release, the difference in reincarceration rates was not statistically significant.22 State-Level Innovation In addition to NIJ s role in identifying effective criminal justice programs...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 314-5265–271 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.4-5.265
Published: 01 April 2019
... same trend.10 The damage from the War on Drugs has not been borne equally by all Americans. Despite equal culpability in the sale and use of illegal drugs, Blacks and Whites are not equally as likely to be incarcerated for drug-related offenses. In 1980, 23 percent of those arrested for drug offenses...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 314-5284–298 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.4-5.284
Published: 01 April 2019
... genius and Internet pioneer Aaron Swartz, who was arrested for breaking into a computer closet at MIT and connecting a laptop carrying a program he had designed to download articles from the JSTOR academic database. Despite the fact that Swartz caused no permanent damage to any of the systems, and...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 314-5316–320 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.4-5.316
Published: 01 April 2019
... of one hundred thousand persons arrested in Chicago in 1912, more than one half were held for violation of legal precepts which did not exist twenty-five years before. 28 At the time of the founding, several accounts tell of courts disposing of as many as a hundred felony trials in a few days. 29...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 314-5279–283 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.4-5.279
Published: 01 April 2019
... mandatory minimum sentences, recidivist enhancements, or once- mandatory guidelines, the post-trial sentence can be much longer. Consider the case of Derrin Perkins. Arrested by local police in 1991, unarmed, in possession of only 17 grams of crack cocaine, he was prosecuted first locally and later fed...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 314-5321–330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.4-5.321
Published: 01 April 2019
...- ment is not triggered until a defendant is indicted, common law disclosure requirements apply from the time of arrest and require any immediate disclosure [which] justice and fairness require . . . in the particular circumstances of the case. 60 Accordingly, from the point of laying a criminal charge...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 314-5331–368 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.4-5.331
Published: 01 April 2019
... released and his conviction vacated after the DNA was matched to another man arrested in an unrelated crime who later confessed to this crime.35 These examples show that the threat of a substantially greater sentence following a conviction at trial is a powerful incentive for even an innocent person to...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 313208–213 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.3.208
Published: 01 February 2019
..., Black men are imprisoned at six times the rate of White men, and Black women are imprisoned at nearly twice the rate of White women.3 These disparities cannot be simply attrib- uted to higher propensity to commit crimes. Research shows that people of color are more likely to be arrested and sen- tenced...
Journal Articles
Federal Sentencing Reporter. 2019; 313195–207 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fsr.2019.31.3.195
Published: 01 February 2019
... no relationship between imprisonment rates and rates of drug use, overdose deaths, or arrests for drug law violations.7 In other words, evidence shows more punitive criminal justice responses such as felony convictions are not effective tools to deter drug use or mitigate the harm it can cause. On...