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Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2018; 4158–83 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2018.4.1.58
Published: 01 January 2018
...Jennifer Hyland Wang This article examines how the writers and publicists behind the pioneering radio serial Clara, Lu 'n' Em circulated representations of gendered labor in early prime-time and daytime network radio. Through their satiric impersonations of “syntax-scrambling” midwestern housewives...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2017; 3257–77 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2017.3.2.57
Published: 01 April 2017
... Mizejewski, Kathleen Rowe Karlyn). Ultimately it argues that, rather than constituting a “ghost of women's comedy past,” Fields's persona in feminized TV spaces such as the daytime talk show has more in common with the work of contemporary female comedians than has been previously acknowledged...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2019; 53168–194 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2019.5.3.168
Published: 01 July 2019
... personal support of Greenwood, she was not chosen as host of the reinstated sessions; Catherine King was appointed instead. 32 King already had broadcasting experience as the instigator of successful daytime children's programming on the local ABC after kindergartens were closed down in Western...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2019; 5360–84 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2019.5.3.60
Published: 01 July 2019
... of life and consumption.” 16 Female radio audiences especially dominated during the daytime hours, and broadcast content was typically directed toward housewives, domestic servants, and children. In addition to the usual musical fare, there were serial melodramas (although, unlike the United...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2019; 5385–113 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2019.5.3.85
Published: 01 July 2019
... confined to daytime programming targeted at women and children, these sessions often defied conventional notions of “feminine” content. Alongside discussions of fashion, food, and housewifery, broadcasters such as Linda Littlejohn, Irene Greenwood, Constance Duncan, Catherine King, Enid Lyons, and Ruby...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2019; 53114–139 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2019.5.3.114
Published: 01 July 2019
... Columbia, something that Quigley constantly grappled with. For example, in 1934–35 she was at the center of discussions about the relaying of a light program, predominantly of music, from the United States on a Saturday afternoon. 49 With shortwave transmissions in the daytime now improving, this had...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2019; 5336–59 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2019.5.3.36
Published: 01 July 2019
...-camera shooting, and other standard practices of US daytime soap operas while also borrowing such narrative conventions of Latin American family dramas as hyperbolic characters, twists of fate, and characteristically maternal female protagonists. 40 However, it is important to note that the boom...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2019; 539–35 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2019.5.3.9
Published: 01 July 2019
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2018; 44109–129 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2018.4.4.109
Published: 01 October 2018
..., daytime, news, etc. There was a second problem with the study—and many that followed, by the WGA and other trade unions. Data on women of color working within the industry was rarely made distinguishable—women of color were often categorized either with white women or men of color—both groups that were...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2018; 42117–122 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2018.4.2.117
Published: 01 April 2018
...: Recent Women's Films and Soap Opera” (PhD diss., Northwestern University, 1981); “The Role of the Woman Reader: Eco's Narrative Theory and Soap Operas,” Tabloid 6 (1981): 35–43; “Promise and Contradiction: The Daytime Television Serial,” Film Reader 5 (Winter 1982): 150–63. 12. Charlotte...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2018; 42173–178 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2018.4.2.173
Published: 01 April 2018
... supposedly lower-class “mass” female audiences—theoretically securely contained in the daytime hours—and emphasizing their prestigious, masculine-identified prime-time programming. This attitude dominated early radio histories focusing on the industry's development and well-known radio auteurs like Norman...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2018; 42157–161 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2018.4.2.157
Published: 01 April 2018
... production studies from below. In the final chapter of The Money Shot (2002), Laura Grindstaff richly details her experiences entering the industry from the bottom up as a production intern. She argues that “the how of my observing cannot be disentangled from what I came to see: that daytime talk as a...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2018; 411–10 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2018.4.1.1
Published: 01 January 2018
... to the daytime schedule. The series began as a nightly show that starred three Northwestern college graduates who performed their comedic political banter in the guise of midwestern housewives taking breaks from their domestic routines. Working through an archive of marketing material, Wang explores...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2018; 41142–170 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2018.4.1.142
Published: 01 January 2018
... cleaning, badly, while becoming increasingly obsessed with daytime soap operas. The housewives in the neighborhood are charmed by his willingness to serve as a stay-at-home dad; one even attempts to have an affair with him. Meanwhile, Caroline is a natural at advertising because her homemaking experience...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2017; 32141–165 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2017.3.2.141
Published: 01 April 2017
... the variations in their performances can be attributed to when, where, and for whom they were performing. Both comediennes performed in every conceivable medium, including scripted movies and television, daytime and late-night talk shows, reality television, game shows, commercials, and live theater...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2016; 24143–168 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2016.2.4.143
Published: 01 October 2016
... F. Cassidy, “Domesticity in Doubt: Arlene Francis and Home,” in What Women Watched: Daytime Television in the 1950s (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005), 131–56; and Christine Becker, “Faye Emerson and the Early Television Personality,” in It's the Pictures That Got Small: Hollywood Film...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2015; 1431–45 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2015.1.4.31
Published: 01 October 2015
... the migration of serials from evening to daytime was fueled more by the need for networks to look respectable in the wake of the Communications Act of 1934 than by any problem with ratings in evening hours. Michele Hilmes, Only Connect: A Cultural History of Broadcasting in the United States , 3rd ed...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2015; 1446–70 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2015.1.4.46
Published: 01 October 2015
... were rationalized into daily schedules, a process that presumed daytime programming should address a more feminine, commercialized audience, women's voices were built into the fabric of the “talk” and home service programs that were believed to have no place in the more sophisticated evening hours. 41...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2015; 13127–162 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2015.1.3.127
Published: 01 July 2015
... virgin/whore dichotomy between the daytime Theresa, a caring teacher, and the nighttime Theresa, who takes drugs and sleeps around. Such polarization is hardly surprising given the era in which the film was made; what is remarkable is that the film suggests that Theresa is aware that she has internalized...
Journal Articles
Feminist Media Histories. 2015; 1237–63 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2015.1.2.037
Published: 01 April 2015
... All-Home TV?,” New York Times , January 5, 1995, C4. 18. Megan Rosenfeld, “Do-It-Yourself TV; Daytime Home Shows Cater to the Nation's Urge to Cocoon,” Washington Post , October 22, 1997, D1. 19. Lynn Spigel, TV by Design: Modern Art and the Rise of Network Television (Chicago...