My experience of fan culture, my conception of fan studies as a field, and my own fan scholarly identity are intimately bound up with feminism. It was foregrounded in my initial encounters with fan studies, sitting in Anna McCarthy's television studies course and reading Henry Jenkins's Textual Poachers (1992) as an NYU undergraduate.1 It enveloped me as a graduate student through the support of my fellow fan scholars, echoing both the communal support networks of fandom as well as the self-reflexivity of feminist scholarship. It has haunted me over the past decade, as I've witnessed growing strains of misogyny, racism, and homophobia in geek and fan culture. And it has...

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