For decades, feminist and critical scholars have spoken explicitly about the politics of citations. Sara Ahmed writes, “Citation is feminist memory,” then continues by “citing feminists of color who have contributed to the project of naming and dismantling the institutions of patriarchal whiteness.”1 In November 2017, thousands of feminists gathered at the National Women's Studies Association conference to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the Combahee River Collective Statement, an often-cited Black feminist text that served as a roadmap for some and a sacred text for others.2 This statement and its regular citation together demonstrate feminist memory as well as two connected ways to think about Black feminist media studies...

You do not currently have access to this content.