Given feminism's explicit remit over gender politics, it would be easy to point to every feminist media scholar of the past century as having an implicit standpoint toward media politics, whether it be around issues of representation, institutional dynamics, or uses and interactions. Yet a genealogy of feminist scholars who explicitly address media law and policy—the study of media and governance—well, that's a rarer breed. The governance guys tend to flock together, flapping their white papers and cooing in the strange undertones of technocratic discourses. Women who historically distinguished themselves in the field tended to fly alongside, and were not feminist per se in their scholarship.

Which raises the question, What...

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