In the broadest sense of the term, data are bits of information gathered to inform historical, social, and scientific processes. Long before the digital era, our data was collected, classified, and analyzed to design governmental policy, influence consumer habits, and establish proper civic behavior and normative gender identities. While scholars have debated the historical roots, uses, and management of data, fundamentally data are the substance of the archive. The ways in which digital and material data are collected, read, and made available has long been a source of debate.1 Through different modes of reading—against or along the grain—feminist and postcolonial scholars have uncovered silenced voices, untangled hierarchies of historical production,...

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