Living in Indigenous Sovereignty works to address white settler relationships with Indigenous Peoples and Nations. Elizabeth Carlson-Manathara, the principal writer of the book, grounds narratives by 16 nonacademic predominantly non-Indigenous activists who likewise grapple with settler and Indigenous relations in Canada. Carlson-Manathara argues that Indigenous-led social movements such as Idle No More and surfacing legacies of settler violence made apparent by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit people (MMIWG2S) detail legacies of settler violence that were surfaced by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Carlson-Manathara argues that settlers reorienting to alliances with Indigenous Peoples and Nations can transform the lives of settlers beyond these relationships. This follows calls made by Indigenous activists in the wake of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the unsurprising discovery of hundreds of Indigenous bodies at former residential schools. While Indigenous activists and scholars have made these calls...

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