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Keywords: Black carbon
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Journal Articles
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene (2022) 10 (1): 00024.
Published: 26 August 2022
...) between June 2018 and October 2019. We also measured equivalent black carbon (eBC) mass concentration in PM 2.5 in Caracas during the same period. Our goal is to assess PM 2.5 and eBC temporal variation and identify their major sources in the area. eBC showed a pronounced diurnal cycle in the urban site...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene (2022) 10 (1): 000063.
Published: 27 May 2022
... and urban/industrial types over Bangladesh with insignificant contribution from the dust aerosol. Black carbon (BC) was the prominent absorbing aerosol (45.9%–89.1%) in all seasons with negligible contributions from mixed BC and/or dust and dust alone. Correlations between FMF and SSA confirmed that BC...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene (2018) 6: 13.
Published: 09 February 2018
...A.S. Pradeep Ram; X. Mari; J. Brune; J.P. Torréton; V.T. Chu; P. Raimbault; J. Niggemann; T. Sime-Ngando; Jody W. Deming; Tamar Barkay Increasing human activity has raised concerns about the impact of deposition of anthropogenic combustion aerosols (i.e., black carbon; BC) on marine processes...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene (2017) 5: 75.
Published: 06 December 2017
...Xavier Mari; Thuoc Chu Van; Benjamin Guinot; Justine Brune; Jean-Pierre Lefebvre; Patrick Raimbault; Thorsten Dittmar; Jutta Niggemann; Jody W. Deming; Laurenz Thomsen Emissions of black carbon (BC), a product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, biofuels and biomass, are high in the Asia...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene (2014) 2: 000027.
Published: 10 June 2014
... accelerates melting, leading to a temperature-albedo feedback that amplifies Arctic warming. Black carbon (BC), in particular, has been implicated as a major warming agent at high latitudes. BC and co-emitted aerosols in the atmosphere, however, attenuate sunlight and radiatively cool the surface. Warming...
Includes: Supplementary data