This performative autoethnography sways between past and present, setting two towers and a flying trapeze into a “responsive dialogue” in the liminal space between waiting and weightlessness, the mirrored mediations engage in an intra-active word play that reflects the forward–back arcing rhythms of lived experience. The pas de deux of the intertwined stanzas seeks to embody on the page an iterative conversation between memory and materiality, time and form, sorrow and joy, connections missed… and connections made.

This performative autoethnography sways between past and present, setting two towers and a flying trapeze into a “responsive dialogue”1 in the liminal space2 between waiting and weightlessness, the mirrored mediations engage in an intra-active3 word play that reflects the forward–back arcing rhythms of lived experience. The pas de deux of the intertwined stanzas seeks to embody on the page an iterative conversation between memory and materiality, time and form, sorrow and joy, connections missed… and connections made.

NOTES

NOTES
1.
Mikhail Mikhaĭlovich Bakhtin, The Dialogic Imagination, trans. Michael Holquist and Caryl Emerson (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981).
2.
Victor Turner, “Betwixt and Between: The Liminal Period in Rites of Passage,” in Betwixt and Between: Patterns of Masculine and Feminine Initiation, ed. Louise Carus Mahdi, Steven Foster, and Meridith Little (La Salle, IL: Open Court, 1987), 3–19.
3.
Karen Barad, “Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 28, no. 3 (2003): 801–31.
4.
Joni Mitchell, “Chelsea Morning,” Clouds (Hollywood, CA: Reprise, 1969), CD.
5.
Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle: A Novel (New York: Random House, 2009).
6.
Simon and Garfunkel, “The 59th Street Bridge Song,” Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme (New York: Columbia, 1966), CD.
7.
The Who, “I Can See for Miles,” The Who Sell Out (London: Decca, 1967), CD.
8.
Joni Mitchell, “Both Sides Now,” Clouds (Hollywood, CA: Reprise, 1969), CD.
9.
Cat Stevens, “Morning Has Broken,” Teaser and the Firecat (Santa Monica, CA: A&M Records, 1971), CD.
10.
Prior to the Iraq War, US Secretary of State Colin Powell gave a speech to the United Nations asserting that Iraq had purchased yellow cake uranium from Niger, which Powell framed as proof that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction. This information was later shown to be erroneous. Seymour M. Hersh, “Who Lied to Whom? Why Did the Administration Endorse a Forgery About Iraq's Nuclear Program?” The New Yorker, 31 March 2003, https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2003/03/31/who-lied-to-whom.
11.
Adam Nagourney, “Obama Elected President as Racial Barrier Falls,” The New York Times, 4 November 2008, http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/05/us/politics/05elect.html.
12.
On the day President Obama was inaugurated, then Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told his colleagues that their goal should be to limit him to one term. Major Garrett, “Top GOP Priority: Make Obama a One-Term President,” National Journal, 23 October 2010.
13.
John Green, Looking for Alaska (New York: Penguin, 2005).
15.
Kenneth Feld, “Feld Entertainment Announces Final Performances of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus,” press release, 14 January 2017, www.feldentertainment.com/pressroom.
16.
William Shakespeare, Hamlet (Hauppauge, NY: Barron's Educational Series, 2002), 2.2.603.