In “An Autoethnography of What Happens,” Kathleen Stewart writes that autoethnography's (and other writing that takes up the self–world relation) focus on writing theory through the device of the self is “unsettling for some, a relief for others.”1 Autoethnography's hallmarks of vulnerability and openness to exploring the emotional and affective terrain of experience are often called out as the cause for such unsettled responses. However, Stewart suggests that the unfinished, inconclusive nature of autoethnographic explorations—and our ability as scholars and researchers to lay out just what things might mean or what we might do about them—might have as much or more to do with such “extreme responses” to the work.2 Whether the response...

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