In “Evaluating (Evaluations of) Autoethnography,” Craig Gingrich-Philbrook writes that autoethnography has a stake in telling “disorienting stories,” a term borrowed from William A. Beardslee that refers to narratives that tell of when we are blocked; discriminated against; experience violence, abuse, and rejection; and excluded from what “counts” as knowledge or success or values. We tell disorienting stories in contrast and supplement to the “orienting” stories that work to predict and guide behavior, experience, and values—stories such as “our success depends on our effort, everyone in the US has equal opportunity… our families will always love us, and education trains people to question consensual reality.” Autoethnography (and more broadly, narrative-based research) recognizes that every story has both orienting and disorienting aspects and in light of this, works the critical space between and across them, refusing to separate the two. I am grateful to Gingrich-Philbrook for this orienting story of...

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