Created by Patricia Hill Collins over 20 years ago, Black Feminist Thought (BFT)1 has flourished in multiple disciplines including sociology, English, political science, psychology, education, law, history, philosophy, Africana studies, mass communication, and communication studies. Since its inception, BFT has served as a key means to unapologetically center the embodied knowledge of Black women and foster opportunities for Black women to “talk back”2 to systemic oppression(s). To honor the legacy of BFT and propel its theoretical and methodological significance into the future, this special issue will feature critical, qualitative, and performative works that productively utilize, challenge, and extend BFT.

Essays in this special issue will be characterized by:

Exemplars of how BFT can...

You do not currently have access to this content.