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hazardous-labor-conditions

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Journal Articles
California History. 2017; 94320–36 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ch.2017.94.3.20
Published: 01 November 2017
... World War II California Richmond & East Bay race environment shipyards and industry hazardous labor conditions ALISTAIR W. FORTSON Victory Abroad, Disaster at Home Environment, Race, and World War II Shipyard Production ABSTRACT Richmond, California, a small industrial center north of...
Journal Articles
California History. 2016; 93420–41 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ch.2016.93.4.20
Published: 01 November 2016
... food . . . , the hot water and soap, the white towels and shining dishes which they use in the school kitchen. 69 Given the typical conditions of the average Mexican laborer, it is likely that the women marveled at such items not out of ignorance or unfamil- iarity, but rather from the amazement at the...
Journal Articles
California History. 2012; 90140–69 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/41853239
Published: 01 January 2012
... confrontation with a "committee for the protection of white labor," whose threats forced some of the early live/work residents to leave.47) Elbert Hubbard, recalling his late 1902 visit, reported on the effect of these outlanders on the rough slopes above Dimond: "Soon a whole little village smiled upon us from...
Journal Articles
California History. 2011; 88322–65 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/23052248
Published: 01 January 2011
... disturb you. I know you need as much rest as possible for the sake of the baby."6 32 California History volume 88 / number 3 / 2011 56 o,four Two hours later, he and Margaret, now thirty-two, took a taxi to Stanford Hospital, a full-service city facility. After a siege of prolonged labor pains, their...
Journal Articles
California History. 2010; 87222–67 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25702950
Published: 01 January 2010
... the agri cultural labor force, a new tribe of Anglo home steaders slowly setded the Sur. From Alsatia, Michael and Barbara Pfeiffer arrived in 1869 with four children. Manuel Innocenti, an Indian, and David Castro?former vaqueros on Cooper Ranch?bought small farms. Many of the set tlers were Yankees...
Journal Articles
California History. 2010; 87426–68 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25763065
Published: 01 January 2010
..., and improved conditions were precisely what the desert lacked, along with water for irrigation and cheap labor to install the fencing needed to protect the defenseless plants from hungry rab bits and other predators. Growers in India or North Africa sent Burbank testimonial letters, but American...
Journal Articles
California History. 2008; 8618–61 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40495187
Published: 01 January 2008
...), September 7, 1928. 13 Strawn, "The Enigma of Robert Hunter," 36. 14 Ibid. 15 Ibid., 35. 16 Hunter, The Links, 3. 17 Ibid., 4. 18 Ibid., 21. 19 Ibid., 15. 20 Ibid., 16. 21 Robert Hunter, Violence and the Labor Movement (New York: Macmillan, 1914). 22 Robert...
Journal Articles
California History. 2008; 85144–64 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25161929
Published: 01 January 2008
... established in Monterey in 1770. Although Franciscan missionaries led by Father Junipero Serra began at once to recruit Indians to the mission settlement as laborers and Christian converts, they understood little of Native American language, culture, or group differences. The Indians living in the immedi ate...
Journal Articles
California History. 2008; 85224–49 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25139147
Published: 01 January 2008
... Browning Scripps, Edward Scripps's half sister, had an abiding interest in the park. A Teddy Roosevelt Bull-Moose Republican whose favorite president was Abraham Lincoln, she supported such pro gressive causes as women's rights and suffrage, protection of domestic servants and farm labor ?0 California...
Journal Articles
California History. 2008; 85348–72 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40495164
Published: 01 January 2008
... the fact that it was designed by a painter, Mr. Bruce Porter, whose chief aim in laying it out was to furnish an appropriate setting for the human figure. It is an expression in art in which the human element is a condition to the complete realization of its purpose. It is, there- fore, a garden not...
Journal Articles
California History. 2007; 84426–65 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25161914
Published: 01 October 2007
... depressed economy and in response to the menace of seismic disasters, laborers, contractors, and architects would be engaged through federal relief programs to build a stronger, safer, more practical educational set ting for the Southland. For now, at the turn of the twentieth century, Cal ifornians saw...
Journal Articles
California History. 2005; 8318–27 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25161784
Published: 01 January 2005
...Peter A. Coates Copyright 2005 CHS Garden and Mine, Paradise and Purgatory: LANDSCAPES OF LEISURE AND LABOR IN CALIFORNIA By Peter A. Coates A TALE OF TWO PLACES In his best-selling book, the ironically titled Merrie England (1894), a prominent British socialist explained to northern England's...
Journal Articles
California History. 2004; 8212–75 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25161710
Published: 01 January 2004
... spend it the most extravagantly. The dirty newspa per boys on the street, the dray men, even the commonest laboring man can always raise his five dollars to bet on a horse race, cock fight, or any other sport that happens to be on the carpet. The wealthy planters who frequent the city during the winter...
Journal Articles
California History. 2004; 8238–47 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25161743
Published: 01 January 2004
... to Los Angeles the following year and worked as a laborer tending ditches for the Los Angeles City Water Company. The president of the company rode by Mulholland's work site one day, noticed his single-minded attention to his job, and asked him his name and what he was doing. "It's none of your...
Journal Articles
California History. 2003; 813-4224–271 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25161706
Published: 01 January 2003
...: Archival Photographs as Historical Documents," California History 68 (Spring-Summer 1989): 2-13, 59-60. 42 Report of the Committee Appointed by the Chamber of Commerce of San Francisco, To Re- port on the Condition of Our Postal Affairs and to Consider the Feasibility of Improvements and Reforms, San...
Journal Articles
California History. 2000; 794192–207 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25463705
Published: 01 December 2000
... their own standards. The lack of urban order and its corresponding sense of social freedom found expression in the basic units of urban form. Permanent buildings, symbolic and tangible statements of civic health, were erected in uneven and halting fashion. Throughout the sum mer of 1849 few laborers...
Journal Articles
California History. 2000; 792316–346 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25463697
Published: 01 July 2000
.... While some such men were starting to join together to resist the subordination of labor that the shift from a commercial capitalism to an industrial capitalism seemed to portend, others jumped at the chance for a more individualist solution to vagaries of economic change?and the discovery of gold in...
Journal Articles
California History. 1999; 782108–113 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25462544
Published: 01 July 1999
... state. The greatest challenge in building the railroad came in laying rails through the heart of the Sierra Nevada. Most of the construction on the western por tion of the line was performed by thousands of Chi nese laborers who worked under dangerous conditions for low wages. On May 10,1869, after six...
Journal Articles
California History. 1998; 77298–105 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25462475
Published: 01 July 1998
... Europe and Mexico. Colonial struc tures were larger and more complex than those of Native Californians. They required both the crafts manship of skilled artisans and physical labor pro vided by Spanish and Native workers, and animals. Like Native Californians, colonial settlers relied primarily on local...
Journal Articles
California History. 1997; 762-3196–229 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25161667
Published: 01 July 1997
..., Indians were to become the labor force in a new Spanish world, created in Alta California, by being drawn voluntarily into the missions, where they would be converted to Christianity, baptized as neophytes into the new faith, and taught the rules of religion, language, and law.19 After ten years of...