It is a pleasure to review this new title by the scholar whose first book launched my undergraduate scholarly path and shaped what eventually became my own book. Sánchez paints a fine-grained, rich portrait of a multiracial, multifaceted, vibrant community stretching from European conquest to contemporary battles over gentrification. Mining a wide variety of sources, including oral histories, photos, letters, government documents, and organizational records, Sánchez shows how the experiences and memories of Boyle Heights residents “contradicted the main tenets of white supremacy, as well as the logic of ethnic succession: that a working multiracial neighborhood was an impossibility because of deep ethnic and racial hatreds, as well as the economic and social competition for resources” (12). Instead, denizens organized across national and language differences and lived together in a way that “refused to fall in line with the highly segregated nature of society enacted by white supremacists and elites...

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