The United States established and operated dozens of off-reservation Indian boarding schools (IBS) from the late 1800s through the twenty-first century. Previous scholarship—including They Called It Prairie Light: The Story of Chilocco Indian School (1994) by K. Tsianina Lomawaima and Education for Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875–1928 (1995) by David Wallace Adams—documented how IBS policies and practices aimed to forcibly assimilate Native American children into white American society and make them into subservient workers. In Assimilation, Resilience, and Survival: A History of the Stewart Indian School, 1890–2020, Samantha M. Williams makes a compelling contribution to historical scholarship on the IBS system. Superbly researched and beautifully written, the book presents an in-depth case study of the Stewart Indian School, an off-reservation boarding school located in Carson City, Nevada, that operated from 1890 to 1980.

The objectives of the book, Williams explains, are to “examine this complicated...

You do not currently have access to this content.