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juvenal

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Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (2): 250–274.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Michael Ritter The implications of the persona theory pose a problem for the interpretation of Juvenal's early satires, because it presents the satirist as intent on nullifying his didactic stances. This leaves us with an unsatisfactory conclusion that excises Juvenal's persistent treatment of...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (1972) 5: 227–240.
Published: 01 January 1972
...Kenneth Weisinger Copyright 1972 The Regents of the University of California [Footnotes] 1 Otto Ribbeck, Der echte und der unechte Juvenal (Berlin 1865) 83. 2 John D. Lewis, Juvenal, ed. by Lewis (London 1882) 448. 3 Ibid. 4 Andreas Weidner, Juvenal, ed. by Weidner...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (1970) 3: 1–34.
Published: 01 January 1970
..., and 11.7.7. 31 Juvenal alludes to the same point in 6.87, 10.81, and 11.53 and 197. 32 Cicero Ad fam. 7.1 Pliny Epist. 9.6. 33 Martial 2.14.12. 34 Horace S. 2.6.63 Ovid Met. 15.75ff. 37 R. Marache, "Rhétorique et humour chez Juvénal," Hommages à Jean Bayet (Brussels 1964...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (1979) 12: 283–303.
Published: 01 January 1979
...David Sweet Copyright 1981 The Regents of the University of California Notes 1 G. Highet, Juvenal the Satirist (Oxford 1954) 256-257 W. S. Anderson, "Studies in Book I of Juvenal," YCS 15 (1957) 68-71 M. Coffey, "Juvenal Report for the Years 1941-1961," Lustrum 8 (1963) 206. 2...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2013) 32 (1): 1–34.
Published: 01 April 2013
.... The article ends with the comparandum of the first satire of Tacitus's near contemporary, Juvenal, suggesting that, in the case of these works that can look with hindsight on the social and political past of the Early Empire, their modes of transmission and reception may be politically determined (e.g...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (2): 217–249.
Published: 01 October 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (1): 91–140.
Published: 01 April 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (1): 2–35.
Published: 01 April 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (1): 58–90.
Published: 01 April 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2000) 19 (1): 138–179.
Published: 01 April 2000
... public performance. Critics of the recitatio such as Horace, Persius, Petronius and Juvenal represent it as an informal and popular event that panders to public taste and incurs infamy. These critics charge that the epic recital has an effeminizing effect both on the recitator and on his audience, a...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2018) 37 (2): 351–378.
Published: 01 October 2018
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2016) 35 (2): 215–246.
Published: 01 October 2016
... discourse, one that identifies traffic with the fertility of the city and its ability to reproduce Roman citizens. In his third satire, Juvenal has his friend Umbricius mouth a lengthy tirade on the crushing burdens of urban life, before departing for good from the ancient world s biggest metropolis...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2016) 35 (1): 45–85.
Published: 01 April 2016
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2015) 34 (2): 296–321.
Published: 01 October 2015
... seem to have stuck especially in memory, so much so that Pliny brings up Curius and his turnips in a section on radishes, making the very good point that Curius was no radish-eater,33 and Athenaeus seems to believe that Curius ate nothing but turnips!34 Juvenal s evocation of Curius remembers him for...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2015) 34 (1): 183–208.
Published: 01 April 2015
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2014) 33 (1): 174–226.
Published: 01 April 2014
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2013) 32 (2): 322–377.
Published: 01 October 2013
..., Aethiopicus), reappears in all the major Latin poets from Lucilius to Juvenal and Statius. As late as the first century ce, Silius Italicus could still refer to Aethiopes utrique (Punica 3.265); the elder Pliny indicates, however, that such a usage, while generically still apposite for epic, was...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2013) 32 (2): 243–282.
Published: 01 October 2013
.... Serm. 1.6.38 44, Tibull. 2.5.39, Propertius, Persius, Juvenal) the abrupt intrusion of new speakers is both detectable and contestable. Note Fraenkel 1957: 428n.1 on Hor. C. 4.4.73 If a change of speaker took place after 72, how was the reader to realize it at a time when there existed no quotation...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2013) 32 (1): 176–199.
Published: 01 April 2013
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2012) 31 (2): 256–292.
Published: 01 October 2012