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emotion

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Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2016) 35 (2): 279–314.
Published: 01 October 2016
...Aaron M. Seider This article considers Catullus’ reaction to his brother’s death and argues that the poet, having found the masculine vocabulary of grief inadequate, turns to the more expansive emotions and prolonged dedication offered by mythological examples of feminine mourning. I begin by...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2016) 35 (2): 189–214.
Published: 01 October 2016
...Seth Estrin Focusing on a single funerary monument of the late archaic period, this paper shows how such a monument could be used by a bereaved individual to externalize and communalize the cognitive, perceptual, and emotional effects of loss. Through a close examination of the monument’s sculpted...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (2): 250–274.
Published: 01 October 2019
.... Freudenburg 2005: 24 25: . . . anger ranks as the least sociable of human emotions; and it is precisely this emotion that is most commonly associated with satire. While acerbic satire cer- tainly has the ability to repel, it also has the potential to unify. Various historical exempla, both ancient and...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (2): 185–216.
Published: 01 October 2019
... record sensations, emotions and experiences objectively within that caveat [of poten- tial interpretations]. . . . a core principle of sensory archaeologies and histories must therefore be to make clear where imagination, simulation or cognitive techniques have been used in order to gain an insight into...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (2): 298–363.
Published: 01 October 2019
... CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY Volume 38/No. 2/October 2019 There are good reasons why Pindar might be rhetorically, and fleetingly casting a less than complimentary light on the means by which the Pythian ode reached its destination, the principal one being to heighten the contrast with the emotions he hopes his...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (1): 91–140.
Published: 01 April 2019
... dance poses; others mention professional dancers or tea- chers of dancing; others indulge in vivid gestural especially hand language (cheironomia) conveying an emotional state or inner thought that requires translation to an audience of bystanders. For a full dis- cussion see Zimmermann 2016, who...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (1): 36–57.
Published: 01 April 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2019) 38 (1): 2–35.
Published: 01 April 2019
... inheritance remains central both to heroic value-systems and to the emotional heart of Roman epic, as well as doing double duty as a metaphor for reverence or antagonism between poets and their forebears.6 For all that, the true conduit of male succession, whether familial or creative, has not always been the...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2018) 37 (2): 187–235.
Published: 01 October 2018
... reason and emotion (see section 3a below) or the standing of the individual visvis other people, material wealth, and the wider world (see sections 3c-d below). Perhaps most clearly, they throw into relief wider tensions between more individualistic, cosmo- politan approaches and more civic, community...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2018) 37 (2): 321–350.
Published: 01 October 2018
... Naiden, and Paraskevi Martzavou have explored the iamata as texts which rely upon didactic, legal, or emotional contents and programs.9 Such rhetorical or discourse analyses, as we might term them, assume that the purpose or function of such a text is to shape the cognitive and affective states of...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2018) 37 (2): 236–266.
Published: 01 October 2018
... profound emotional depth. Life without his friend is like death, and the speaker returns to life when his friend returns home. Comparisons to light characterize welcomes in Homeric poetry as well. Both Eumaeus and Penelope greet Telemachus as sweet light (Odyssey 16.23, 17.41),57 and the Homeric narrator...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2018) 37 (1): 1–30.
Published: 01 April 2018
... possessed with others, alongside them (ibid. 34); and that he is, nonetheless, fasci- nated by the possibility that, in suicide or perhaps better, because less emotive, self-killing it may be possible to glimpse the exercise of an exceptional, and not inevitably negative, agency. The argument has a bearing...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (1973) 6: 151–180.
Published: 01 January 1973
...W. R. Johnson W. R. JOHNSON The Emotions of Patriotism: Propertius 4.6 Anne Amory Parry: In Memoriam Gordon Williams has been savage with one of my favorite poems ("a thoroughly bad poem," "one of the most ridiculous poems in the Latin language and I intend to be savage in its defense.1 But this...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2017) 36 (2): 317–369.
Published: 01 October 2017
... officiate (at the Compitalia or elsewhere) would have created not only a release valve but a carceral mechanism, in the style of those other markers of circumscribed humanity through which slaves were distin- guished from the free.52 The emotional toll of being in all other sacred contexts reduced to a...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2017) 36 (2): 236–287.
Published: 01 October 2017
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2017) 36 (1): 52–103.
Published: 01 April 2017
... and 1998, Harris 2001, Kurihara 2003, Konstan 2006. On vengeance and punishment: Allen 2000, McHardy 2008. On other rivalrous emotions: Konstan and Rutter 2003, Sanders 2014. 2. For the democratization of the rivalrous values of the elite, see most prominently the work of Fisher (1998, 2000). 3...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2017) 36 (1): 1–32.
Published: 01 April 2017
... otherwise used to describe sonic interchange, Peponi s reading of this passage, which is part of a larger analysis of the role of amoib in conceptualizations of musical and emotional reciprocity in the chorus, suggests that the appearance of amoib here demonstrates how dance is also considered a symbolic...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2011) 30 (2): 279–317.
Published: 01 October 2011
... cowardice and treason, behavior that is diametrically opposed to the hoplite ethos and religious devotion that were instilled into young ephebes. Lycurgus thus brings the jurors' memories of their own ephebate into the courtroom and taps into emotions and values that lie at the heart of Athenian collective...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2016) 35 (2): 215–246.
Published: 01 October 2016
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity (2010) 29 (2): 327–348.
Published: 01 October 2010
..., bedrooms, garden—each of which has its own psychosocial and emotional texture, its own challenges, and its own resources. Achilles' modelling of the house may reflect Roman ideas of domestic aristocratic display, and perhaps even the influence of Roman literature (particularly love elegy). TIM WHITMARSH...