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disappearing-river

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Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2020; 391126–151 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2020.39.1.126
Published: 01 April 2020
... it shows itself only its disappearance (13). For the practicalities and sociology of sleep, ancient and modern, see, respec- tively, Strobl 2002 and Williams 2011. 7. As Shapiro 1993: 133 notes, this is practically the only type-scene in which Hupnos figures in the archaic period. Euphronios krater...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2019; 38136–57 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2019.38.1.36
Published: 01 April 2019
...., Wrenhaven 2012: 51, D. M. Lewis 2018: 41 and 41 n.49. 18. For similar concerns on the part of Ibn-Butl n (e.g., that the equitable disposition and lack of courage of the al-Mansuriyya, beyond the river Indus, was the result of the temperate sun in that region, their temperate food, and their clear water...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2019; 38158–90 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2019.38.1.58
Published: 01 April 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2017; 362236–287 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2017.36.2.236
Published: 01 October 2017
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2017; 362317–369 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2017.36.2.317
Published: 01 October 2017
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2017; 36133–51 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2017.36.1.33
Published: 01 April 2017
... phenomena (rivers, harbors, mountains, springs, etc.) and groups of people (and their histories, customs, and forms of organization) that dis- tinguish one place from another.9 Strabo s treatment of cities, however, differs from his handling of other aspects of geography and occupies a unique place in his...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2016; 352147–188 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2016.35.2.147
Published: 01 October 2016
..., while on a large scale it can advance under- standing of such issues as how and why Ocean is connected to the underworld in Greek storytelling or how and why ancient philosophers thought about disappearing rivers. What emerges overall are sharper, much more detailed perceptions of how use- ful an...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2016; 352279–314 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2016.35.2.279
Published: 01 October 2016
... expands the concla- matio of frater in poem 101. Other verbal cues join poems 101 and 65, as manantia (101.9) recalls manans (65.6), which describes the Lethe River washing over Catul- lus brother s feet, and manat (65.24), which denotes the blush of a figure to whom Catullus has been compared.57 Lastly...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2014; 332281–318 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2014.33.2.281
Published: 01 October 2014
... become part of history as well as depicting it. First, descriptions of rivers frame narrative units within book 8 as though the text were a visual image, while failing to perform such a function in the case of the shield itself. Rivers also symbolize both the linear progression of the narrative and its...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2014; 331174–226 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2014.33.1.174
Published: 01 April 2014
... disappear. In Epidicus, the slave/plotter wins his freedom onstage, and the grex, in the final two lines, instructs the audience in the meaning of the plot and how they should react to it (732 33): This is the man who found liberty through his own badness. / Applaud and be well. Stretch your butt and get...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2013; 322283–321 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2013.32.2.283
Published: 01 October 2013
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2013; 321101–175 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2013.32.1.101
Published: 01 April 2013
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2012; 312193–255 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2012.31.2.193
Published: 01 October 2012
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2012; 311128–151 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2012.31.1.128
Published: 01 April 2012
... Italiote allies at the Eleporus River and took Caulonia. He also besieged and eventually conquered Rhegium. It is usually assumed that the alliance of Italiotes mentioned in Diodorus is the same alliance described by Polybius. Both ancient historians suggest Croton was a leading city in the alliance (an...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2012; 3111–55 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2012.31.1.1
Published: 01 April 2012
... to fish in all waters except harbors and sacred rivers, marshes, and lakes This passage can be interpreted as suggesting a customary distinction in Ancient Greek law between inland and marine fisheries, with various categories of This paper has profited from the assistance of numerous colleagues, but...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2011; 302279–317 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2011.30.2.279
Published: 01 October 2011
... literary, epigraphic, and archaeological sources that the area at the south of the Acropolis, near the Ilissus river, was associated with Codrus and thus constituted the cadre mate´riel for this collective memory. A decree of 418/17 (IG 16. Robertson 1988a: 230 31, 238 39, 256. Neleus and Basile might...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2011; 302179–212 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2011.30.2.179
Published: 01 October 2011
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2011; 30187–118 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2011.30.1.87
Published: 01 April 2011
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2010; 292278–326 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/CA.2010.29.2.278
Published: 01 October 2010
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2008; 272231–281 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2008.27.2.231
Published: 01 October 2008