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Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2015; 342296–321 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2015.34.2.296
Published: 01 October 2015
...Molly Pasco-Pranger This article explores the early history of Roman exemplary literature through the case study of the elder Cato’s account of his imitation of the parsimony and self-sufficiency of M’. Curius Dentatus. I reconstruct from Cicero, Plutarch, and other sources a Catonian prose text...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2004; 232323–357 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2004.23.2.323
Published: 01 October 2004
...Enrica Sciarrino After reviewing current opinions about the social function of literature in second-century BCE Rome, I focus on two controversial fragments assigned to Cato the Censor's Origines . In the first, Cato portrays the ancestors in a convivial setting as they sing the praises and the...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 1991; 102237–258 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25010951
Published: 01 October 1991
...- tions of the Royal Society of Canada 35 (1941) 15-18 W. Alexander, "Cato of Utica in the Pages of Seneca the Philosopher," TRSC 40 (1946) 59-74. P. Grenade, "Le mythe de Pompée et les Pompéiens sous les Césars," REA 52 (1950) 28-63 R. Wolverton, "Speculum Caesaris," The James Sprunt Studies 46...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2005; 242331–361 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2005.24.2.331
Published: 01 October 2005
...Brendon Reay This article investigates the interplay of agriculture and writing in the elder Cato's aristocratic self-fashioning (both his individual self-representation, that is, and his construction of aristocracy more broadly). I argue that the De Agricultura represents Cato and his...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2017; 362317–369 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2017.36.2.317
Published: 01 October 2017
...Dan-el Padilla Peralta This article proposes a new interpretation of slave religious experience in mid-republican Rome. Select passages from Plautine comedy and Cato the Elder's De agri cultura are paired with material culture as well as comparative evidence—mostly from studies of Black Atlantic...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2020; 39195–125 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2020.39.1.95
Published: 01 April 2020
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2020; 3911–28 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2020.39.1.1
Published: 01 April 2020
... conquered the world and defeated enemy kings as his opponents, such as Pharnaces in Pontus and Juba in Africa. At the same time, however, he advertised his victories over his Roman rivals, including notably Cato the Younger; their suicides were depicted in paintings paraded as part of the procession.27 Yet...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2019; 382217–249 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2019.38.2.217
Published: 01 October 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2008; 272203–230 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2008.27.2.203
Published: 01 October 2008
... Book 8 of the Letters . Though he lacks a child or adoptive heir himself, Pliny embeds his work in a tradition in which Roman writers from the Elder Cato onward presented literary authority as coextensive with paternal authority. In Ep . 8.14, Pliny presents an idealized image of education by fathers...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2019; 3812–35 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2019.38.1.2
Published: 01 April 2019
..., patronage, and educational mentoring evi- dently remained patterned on it.3 In the literary sphere, too, the relationship plays a central role, especially in contexts that involve the transmission of inherited cul- tural capital. Many Latin works were dedicated to sons by their fathers Cato, Cicero, Livy...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2019; 381141–183 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2019.38.1.141
Published: 01 April 2019
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2018; 372267–320 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2018.37.2.267
Published: 01 October 2018
....; Cato ORF4 fr. 190 (apud Festus 266 L., where the word is glossed as malleus); Laberius fr. 27 Panayotakis. 51. Aldrete 2014: 35 36; stunning was needed to ensure the safety of the attendants and enable a successful sacrifice, since a defiant or struggling animal was considered inauspicious. Malleus as...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2018; 372351–378 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2018.37.2.351
Published: 01 October 2018
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2018; 372187–235 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2018.37.2.187
Published: 01 October 2018
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2018; 3711–30 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2018.37.1.1
Published: 01 April 2018
... in this period, it is self-consciously modeled (by the actors themselves and/or by the authors who record the deaths) on that of Socrates: cf. Tac. Ann. 16.35: Thrasea Paetus; Plu. Cat. Mi. 68.2, 70.1: Cato; Tac. Ann. 16.19: Petronius Arbiter. 7. However, see Morgan 2003: 182 93 for Plato s interest...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2017; 362370–389 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2017.36.2.370
Published: 01 October 2017
... folk etymology. Lindsay s edition of Nonius reads (2.169 M) Varro Cato vel de liberis educandis (7): his Semonibus lacte fit, non uino; Cuninae propter cunas, Ruminae propter rumam, id est prisco uocabulo mammam; a quo || subrumi etiamnunc dicuntur agni, but his Semonibus is an old emendation of...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 1996; 152222–260 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/25011041
Published: 01 October 1996
... rather that he hunted instead of pleading cases in the forum. Supporting evidence from Cato the Elder, Ennius, and Plautus shows that hunting was a common and accepted activity among Romans of the mid-Republic. Finally, Sallust's criticism of hunting cannot be assumed to represent Roman views, since he...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2016; 352215–246 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2016.35.2.215
Published: 01 October 2016
... war) probably rubs off on Cato s portrait of the triumphing women who support the repeal of the lex Oppia (see part two). 8. The Beach Boys, Fun, Fun, Fun (Capitol, 1964). The chorus later becomes, And we ll have fun fun fun now that daddy took the T-Bird away, because she will now have to ride...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2016; 3511–44 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2016.35.1.1
Published: 01 April 2016
.../April 2016 More detailed, although only indirectly presented as an account of cremation, is Lucan s description of the painful death of one of Cato s soldiers due to the bite of a poisonous snake called seps. Although the victim Sabellus manages to detach the fanged snake from his leg, the damage is...
Journal Articles
Classical Antiquity. 2016; 35145–85 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ca.2016.35.1.45
Published: 01 April 2016
... (for other familial goddesses, ibid. 58). 39. Caelian as Etruscan settlement: Palmer 1970: 125 26; Gantz 1975: 550; Cornell 1995: 134 35; LTUR I.208: s.v. Caelius Mons (G. Giannelli). 40. Cato Orig. II.28 C. (fr. 58 P cf. Fest. p. 128 L. See Cornell 1995: 297 98; cf. Ogilvy on Livy 1.38.1 (an...